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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 131 (some duplicates have been removed)
for failed education systems, failed school systems to get their acts together. throughout the country there are some promising signs that we can bring schools and parents together to improve our educational system. san francisco public schools adopted a funding mechanism according to what's termed a weighted student formula. under this policy the more students a school attracts, the more money that school, its administrators and teachers receive. low-income students are weighted heavier and the funding forum as our children with disabilities, and those learning english as a second language. so there's incentives are schools to seek the more vulnerable population, and reasons for schools to differentiate themselves and to excel. imagine if we were to try and move in this direction with federal funding. allow the money we truly spend to actually follow individual children. students, including those without a lot of money for those with special needs, we be able to access a school which would give them a shot at having a successful life, a shot at earning their success and achieving thei
? plus all the early buzz over tonight's super expensive super bowl ads, all that plus education activist michelle rhee in our sunday spotlight. spot on earth. (all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your mississippi outdoors. i vote for your florida beaches, dawn. bill, this louisiana seafood is delicious. we're having such a great year on the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. now is the perfect time to visit anyone of our states. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride, go fishing or just lay in the sun. we've got coastline to explore and wildlife to photograph. and there's world class dining with our world famous seafood. so for a great vacation this year, come to the gulf. its all fabulous but i give florida the edge. right after mississippi. you mean alabama. say louisiana or there's no dessert. this invitation is brought to you by bp and all of us who call the gulf home. >>> lots
of the healthcare spending. that is an important point. >> let's switch to another passionate topic. education. quite a few questions from the audience on how much can we afford to fund and where should we be funding and investing in the educational system? should it be done on a national level or a state level? >> let's mix it up, you go first. >> i have read that test scores of american elementary and secondary educational students have not increased and the famous nation at risk report in the early 1980's. even though spending has increased dramatically. i question whether the solution to the problem is, let's take those systems and pour money into it are. it's hard to argue against earning more money, that and possibly hurt. but you basically have major structural flaws in the way the system is organized. it is not producing the results that we need. i strongly believe that -- i would say, after entitlement spending, i would put the quality of our educational outcomes as the greatest long-term threat to america's economic strength. it is the most important thing, and it has to do with stru
mailers in march, next month, and will be conducting a number of educational efforts to make sure we reach all business customers. as we get closer to the delivery scheduled change in in august, we will be publishing information in post offices, putting it online and other customer contact to make sure our residential customers know. let me conclude with a couple of thoughts. this announcement today is just one part of a much larger strategy to return the postal service to long-term financial stability. the plans saves $2 billion annually, that we have a $20 billion gap to close. we are striving to raise revenues, reduce costs and gain efficiencies throughout the entire organization and making this change to our delivery schedule is a big-ticket item and simply too big of a cost savings to ignore. in fact, i would strongly argue it would be irresponsible for the postal service not to pursue this course. second, we are implementing this approach to improve our overall business performance. there is a strong and growing demand for our package service and we need to meet that over the coming
were all going to act, no matter how we were involved in the project of educating our kids -- we were going to put our kids first. that sounds like obstruction, but when you are in the hard work of having to close schools, it gives you an ability to remind people of what the interest of kids.ch is acting in whether it is our compact or whether it is here, particularly here, because of the detailed nature, it does give us a road map. and i think it holds together. employer verification, a path to citizenship, making sure we are not rejecting talented people from other countries that have a ph.d. is and a real contribution to make here, and so on all of these things, in a substantive way, hang together. but the politically hang together. over years of debates on immigration reform, it has been clear what the component pieces are that are necessary for a large deal. i can filibuster all day long, but i do think colorado, in some sense, it is unusual, maybe. we seem to -- the ski resorts of mentioned earlier -- a huge number of moving pieces. >> part of politics is put yourselves in the s
be the key to higher education and perhaps even brilliance for a lot of folks who don't necessarily have the time or money for college. say nothing of an ivy league school. online learning is hardly new. it's been around for a long time. but open access to classes at some of this nation's most prestigious institutions is new. and people of all kinds and all ages are signing on. our report from our chief education correspondent, rehema ellis. >> reporter: the college classroom is changing. courses from some of the world's most elite universities are now available to anyone for free. at a furious pace, schools are participating with start-up companies like coursera to deliver online courses. or m.o.o.k.s. >> much faster than any of us were expecting. we reached our first 1 million users faster than facebook. >> reporter: physics, poetry, astronomy, even guitar, all just a click away. university of virginia retooled his modern history course for this semester's online debut. the class usually open to 120 students saw enrollment soar. >> 42,000 students around the world. >> reporter: to put
and strong supporter of catholic education, i once again this year introduced a resolution honoring catholic schools. h.res. 46 expresses support for the vital contributions of the thousands of calt lick elementary and secondary schools -- catholic elementary and secondary schools in the united states and the key role they play in promoting and ensuring a brighter, stronger future for our nation. i'd like to thank the 28 members who co-sponsored this bipartisan resolution with me. since 1974 the national catholic education association, the united states conference of catholic bishops have organized and planned national catholic schools week. this year's theme, catholic schools raise the standards highlights recent initiatives undertaken by catholic schools across the country to strengthen the already exemplary standards. america's catholic schools produce graduates with the schools and integrity needed by our businesses, governments, and communities emphasizing a well-rounded educational experience in instilling the values of giving back to community and helping others. nearly every catholic
enough, it's education education education. >> he had a mental breakdown and crashed a car. i will admit i did crack up watching that stuff because i'm a sick, sick man. >> because it was so stupid. >> because it was so stupid, but you're right he's setting himself up. >> this could force someone who thinks they adore rampage to think awesome let's try that. >> he also miss spelled girl, which upset me.
in education. >> this weekbe is about the future of american public education. >> supporters of the national school choice week campaign kicked off the celebration this week with 14 planned whistle stops across the country. >> organizers say research increasingly shows that students in poor performing public schools given alternatives, whether they be better public schools, charter schools, magnet schools, homeschooling do better. >> the they the says parents who select schools and schools of choice are outperforming the traditional system. they are improving faster than the traditional system. >> case and point is the washington, d.c. opportunity scholarship program that gives 1700 d.c. students vouchers to attend private schools. >> they have a 91% graduation rate. grad rate in d.c. schools hover around 60%. >> like tremendous popularity and shortage of slots the obama administration capped enrollment in the d.c. program under pressure from teachers union. earlier in 2008 campaign speech to the american federation of teachers then candidate obama criticized the opponent for supporterring v
children from getting the supports they need to get educated in school including children with disabilities. whether we are going to be supporting the elderly to help with their heating bill or in the summertime, their air conditioning. whether we provide homeless assistance for people who are homeless to get them back into permanent housing. we are talking about a series of programs that not only help our citizens get back to work. they are fundamental to ensuring families will just survive to the end of the paycheck. >> practically speak the alternative if you look at what president obama laid out yesterday rveg yesterday, he was asking them to take it off the table and put the idea of a grand bargain back on the table. it takes that same basic $1.2 trillion target and this time about half from new revenues and closing loopholes and deductions. the other half is from sbrilthsmentes and this idea of cpi which is a reduction in benefits for people. how would you compare the grand bargains to the programs in which you are talking about if the sequester takes place. is one worse than the othe
, it is the lack of awareness and education that they told us. they never explained to us or even let us know what a concussion was. i had no idea until recently. even since i retired in 2008 from the patriots, i would still experience headaches. i would experience headaches from sunday until tuesday and wednesday. even at times, there's a sense of loneliness, anxiety problems, and sometimes i just get headaches from just being in bright lights. it is tough. people have to understand these players, a lot of their agenda is based on money, but a lot of these players are really suffering read this is for real. i am experiencing now. i am scared to death. i have children and a beautiful wife. i'm scared what will happen to me 10, 15 years from now. >> law concussion were once an unspoken and misunderstood problem, today more than 4000 former nfl players have filed a lawsuit against the league. they contend the nfl, which makes $9.5 billion a year, new hits to the head could lead to long-term brain damage but chose not disclose that information. new rules are being instituted to minimize future injuri
of the shooting at sandy hook elementary school. the "washington post" reports the county board of education will be given recommendations today that include requiring every person entering a county school to show i.d. the schools will also hold two large-scale drills each year including a lockdown drill next month and an active shooter drill in april. >>> and a man is undergoing a menial evaluation this morning for trespassing in an anne arundel county school. 25-year-old justin beaumont is accuse of walking into north county high school in glen burnie, telling people he was bullied when he was a student there more than a decade ago. officers arrested him. when they searched his home, they found several weapons. police say the guns are legal. and beaumont was not armed when he was inside the school. >>> today, it is defense secretary leon panetta's turn to answer questions about september's deadly attack in benghazi, libya. he and the chairman of the joint chiefs will testify before the senate armed services committee. they will discuss the results of the defense department's internal revie
. it's appropriate i do this at georgetown. as the product of jesuit education, as a catholic and as a beneficiary over the years of your outstanding faculty and staff and your important policy contributions that this university has made in a number of areas that affect people of this country. i'm truly honored to have this opportunity today. i've had a deep and abiding respect for georgetown throughout the almost 40 to 50 years that i've been involved in public service. and i have a deep respect for the generation of leaders that have gone forward from this campus to serve our nation. i just had the opportunity to meet with your cadets. some of the cadets in the rotc program. as someone who went through the rotc program at santa clara university and then ultimately served two years in the army, i can tell you that i have tremendous admiration for those that have made the decision to serve this country in uniform. the talents of these men and women and the innovative programs at georgetown's new institute of women, peace and security underscore for me the university's leadersh
of our endeavors and the second one, we are focused on educating physicians in a way that will allow them to participate in this future that is more team based and quite different than the medicine of the past. if there, thinking of the physician sustainability and practice so that physicians can do what they love to do and that is take care of the patient. let me say as a recovering dean and hospital system ceo and now ceo of the ama i have learned to always try to jump in and of adjudicator early conflicts before the blood. so, with grace, len, tom and alladi in our view there is more to become nothing more eloquent than the high road and care. thank you. [applause] >> some news out of washington energy secretary of state chu announced he will resign once his successor is confirmed in a memo to colleagues received by politico. the former prisoners of he's eager to return to california and academic life. the white house released a statement by the press in which he said steve brought to the energy department a unique understanding of both the urgent challenge presented by climate change
to live without. embarrassment's and education and infrastructure. research and development -- investments and education and infrastructure. already republicans and democrats of work together to reduce deficits by $2.50 trillion. that is a good start. to get the rest of the way, we need a balanced set of reforms. for example, we need to lower the cost of health care and programs like medicare that are the biggest drivers of the deficit. these reforms must go hand in hand with eliminating excess spending in the tax code so the wealthiest individuals can ticket veg of loopholes and deductions the kind of bailable to most americans. it can be a year solid growth, more jobs, and higher wages. that will only happen of reporters up to self-inflicted wounds. host: the president in his weekly address. the earlier debt limit with $16.40 trillion. we have surpassed that. you can keep track of it at usdebtclock.org. it is now $60.50 trillion. the next debate over the debt limit is likely to come up mid may. a story from "the weekly standard." we need a better argument against the debt. she writes --
by the taliban stopped her crusading for the right to educate girls is now speaking out for the first time since the near fatal attack and two more surgeries only this weekend. >> today you can see that i'm alive. i can speak. i can see you. i can see everyone, and today i can speak and i'm getting better day by day. this is a second life. i want to serve the people, and i want every girl, every child to be educated, and for that reason we have organized mulala fund. >> northbound's kier is in birmingham, england, outside the hospital. kier, this is remarkable. it is just a miracle of her spirit, of the doctors who have helped her, the family who has been with her. she's now also the youngest nominee for the nobel peace prize. what are you hearing from the medical team around her about her prognosis? >> that's right. incredible. she is still in the hospital behind me recovering. what an amazing recovery. as those comments on camera, the first since she was shot by the taliban, attacked simply for campaigning for the rights of young women to be educated. in those comments she has such poise and y
-the-board cuts to education, to research and development, would have repeat, would have, damaging effects on our economy and our long-term economic prospects. unquote. a growing number of analysts believe the political will to stop the sequester is lacking. it will take effect, at least temporarily, they believe, and that will pose a further the f of this year. question. the fed is saying that the fourth quarter contraction october, november, december of 2012 was due chiefly to quote unquote transitory factors. is this true? or is the recovery stalling out pat buchanan? >> i think basically it is true, john. the u.s. economy is out of the intensive care it was in, in 2007-2008 but it has been walking the hospital halls ever since. the growth has been growing at an average of about 2%, unemployment is where it was when barack obama took office, we are adding about 150,000 jobs a month, but john, the real problem here is this slow growing is occurring when we have had five straight trillion dollars worth of defense deficits to pump it up and we get $85 billion a month in transfusions a month from
look at these issues, do you see problems or opportunities? with an advanced degree in education from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to meet these challenges and make a difference in the lives of students. let's get started at capella.edu. in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective sleep medicine you don't take before bedtime. take it in bed only when you need it and have at least four hours left for sleep. do not take intermezzo if you have had an allergic reaction to drugs containing zolpidem, such as ambien. allergic reactions such as shortness of breath or swelling of your tongue or throat may occur and may be fatal. intermezzo should not be taken if you have taken another sleep medicine at bedtime or in the middle of the night or drank alcohol that day. do not drive or operate machinery until at least 4 hours after taking intermezzo and you're fully awake.
't some separate category, but human rights, and everything that that entailed for access to education, to economic participation, political participation, to be free from violence, and i think when she came out of that setting, no matter where one stood on the political spectrum, right or left, the unanimous conclusion was that it was probably her most historic moment from that time until when she said it and that she was such an extraordinary voice for the united states and all of the values that we held true. you remember so well the thunderous, positive reaction she got in that hall, and she went through a littany of violations of women's rights and said that each of those was, indeed, a violation of human rights. it was like the beginning of a movement. it sparked so much. to this day whenever people meet her or me or so many others, they say i'm so and so, and i was in beijing. it's short-hand for i am committed to what this represented and what you did. >> so now what happens with afghanistan? there's a withdrawal afoot. it's accelerating. what happens to the women of afghanista
in favor of girls education. she is recovering in a british hospital. >>> tourists outside london's buckingham palace got a real surprise today. a man broke through a security cordon and held a large knife to his own neck. in second, police moved in, and that set off a brief confrontation. the man started waving the knife, running at one of the officers, the officer used a taser. the man dropped to the ground and was handcuffed and taken to a police station. >>> this time singer chris brown apparently won't face any civil or criminal charges. fellow singer frank ocean says brown jumped him leading to a brawl over a parking space a week ago at an l.a. recording studio. but ocean says he is dropping the matter. brown is already on five years' probation after assaulting his pop star girlfriend rihanna back in 2009. >>> the man who invented etch a sketch has passed away. french electrician andre cassagnes dreamed up the drawing toy in his garage back in 1950. etch a sketch's popularity got another boost when it appeared in the "toy story" movies. its magic screen is in the national to
. the peace walk is really telling young people to choose education over guns, not to solve your problems with gun violence but with diplomacy and that's so important and with all of this gun violence happening around america, the stand your ground law, mr. roberts, is a law that in trayvon's situation makes no sense. how can you be the aggressor, how can you initiate the confrontation and then say, after i shoot a kid in the heart, i was just standing my ground? so this trayvon martin amendment to the stand your ground law, simply, you can't be aggressor and start the confrontation and then claim that you stood your ground. >> mr. crump, i want to talk to you about what took place in court this week. zimmerman and his side were trying to push more time before going to trial. explain what happened in court and then who was witness number eight? >> certainly. on february 5th, which would have been trayvon martin's 18th birthday, we had a scheduled court hearing to talk about different issues in the trial and that courtroom on that day, the spirit of trayvon martin was definitely in the cou
committees approved a variety of measures including a 3% pay raise for state employees, educators and officers. it addresses school security measures and numerous other benefits. lawmakers are at a stalemate over medicaid under the new affordable care act. many say a loan could delay the passing of the budget. posing the threat of a government shutdown. >>> chancellor michelle reid releases a new book called radical. you'll remember her controversial tenure with the district. she close 23 schools and fired 36 principals during her first year. she reflected her work in d.c. on abc's this week imt. >> my style is deliberative and very focused on doing what's right for kids. i wouldn't change that so much. what we were doing, i think we're absolutely the right things much i needed to focus on how we were communicating those things and doing things. so should i have fired ineffective principals? absolutely. should i have do so on national tv? probably not. >>> she's now the head of students first, an organization pushing for education reform. >>> today new numbers are coming out about
educated. >> but the gi bill is a liberal policy. >> but no, listen to what i'm saying underneath it. i'm talking about the commitment to national defense and understanding of the role of the military and the united states, the relationship between the military national readiness, how we project otherwise in the world. >> but that's the patriotic americans in the united states are african-american? >> sure. but -- >> is there -- >> liberals. those things are -- >> no. but i think when you go underneath, there is a deep well of social conservativism among african-americans. >> i agree 100% with that. but i don't want to see the republican party become a pandering party, either. >> no. that's not what i've said. >> i know that's not what you've said. but our message used to be one of growth, opportunity for everyone. and i think that that still is the message, we just don't get it out in an appropriate way. >> and that's a very good point. >> beyond that, the policy that support that are what's really important and i'd like to see us get back to -- >> can i say quickly, there's been this
was great. she was articulate, well educated, did some wonderful things, knew how to handle the power of male egos, but the press would not give her the same accolade. the general media would not give her the same accolade, not because she was not constant, but because of her political ideology. i think there is some bias in reading hillary clinton -- rating hillary clinton. >> that was lawrence from -- host: that was lawrence from st. paul. "the washington post has this as far as analysis -- nebraska, on the republican line. caller: i would like to make a few comments about hillary clinton. think the only reason that she ever had her job was because of her husband built. she has done exactly what she has been told to do by the president, and a lot of us are not in tune with president obama's schedule. especially when we have at least lousy deals, whenever a person throws her hand up in the air and does not want to admit to any responsibility of the job done poorly that killed some of our american -- not happy with her performance ticket she is just mirror of -- performance. she is j
lived, when you think about the american dream, better education, student debt is an all time high. we have seen the housing bubble burst and better job and unemployment is so high. for adults to be less optimistic than their children may make sense. >> my parents lived through the great depression and all reminded me of that and the difficult times. it made a difference in my life. take a look at this. the next gallup poll, will your kids be better off than you, they are more cautious? >> they just lived through one of the worst recessions we've ever had and we are in the worst of the recoveries we've ever had. in most recent memory they are facing unemployment and wealth is down the stock market is up so there are reasons for optimism but adults in recent memory have so many things that have been going bad, it's tough to be optimistic. >> gregg: throw the next one up. i think it is interesting. it breaks down among gender. look at this. actually better life, homes, better education, girls are more optimistic than boys? >> that is very interesting. we have seen women and girls make tr
'd go across the board so much, i'd go commerce, labor, education, interior, energy. are you kidding me? i would slash everything. i would take out at least a quarter. at least a quarter. i don't care, sequester, i don't even know what it means. what i know is let's get rid of these goofy departments that are bankrupting america. what's your take on that? >> well, got to disagree with you. >> oh. [ laughter ] >> i think that there's certainly a time and place for cuts. as you say earlier, it's usually when the economy is working a little bit better than it is now. i think if you look back historically, the best time for cuts is back to trend growth, which is 3%, not the 2% economy that we're in now. i'll tell you, i just came last week from the world economic forum, one of the big conversation threads there was that we don't want to be europe. europe has gone too far with austerity. and you might say well that's a liberal point of view. but i'll tell you, the american enterprise institute came out with a report this week saying we should take lessons from overseas. we should not do aust
, but at the same time, on issues like health care, on the economy, on education even, latinos are more and more in line with the democratic party today. so if immigration reform gets done, and as it looks right now, it's mostly a democratic thing as opposed to republican thing, it will be hard for republicans to just pull away votes, all at once. >> you know, i want to take a look at numbers relative to a pew poll when it talks about all of the top issues. for hispanic registered voters. look where immigration ranks. number five at 34%. so is the focus on immigration, just a complete oversimplifications on really diverse group of people? >> i think there is a little bit of that going on. i think at the same time there is a recognition this is the most pressing issue with regards to the latino community, we have 11 million, 14 million, whatever the number is. number of illegal immigrants in this country. something they have been trying to deal with for a number of years. very important to a lot of voters. at the same time, it's not the most important issue to these people. the people voting are
'm there to figure out why people commit this crime, to show how it happens and educate people. we approach this like it's a continuing story and continue to cover it. >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press" with david gregory. substituting today, chuck todd. >>> good morning. it's super bowl sunday. and here in washington, some big showdowns are on the horizon. we've got it all covered this morning, including the big game tonight. bob costas of nbc sports will be here to talk about football and player safety issues. >>> but we want to start with a washington battle on full display this week when the president's pick to head the pentagon, former republican senator chuck hagel, came under fire from members of his own party during a very contentious confirmation hearing. >> name one person in your opinion who's intim nated by the israeli lobby in the united states senate. >> are we right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. >> senator hagel, please answer the question i asked. today, do you think unilateral sanctions would
that will talk about issues that don't have to do with the budget. immigration, education, health care. cantor is joining a growing list of republicans who are trying to rebrand the party. >> we have not explained why we take the positions that we do. and i think that's one of the lessons learned from this past election. i think that where we have a lot of room to grow as a party, as conservatives is to explain again why we're for the kind of fiscal discipline that we're for. what is the reality and how are we going to help people? >> we had to show our ideas are better at fighting poverty. how our ideas are better at solving health care. how our ideas are better at solving the problems people are experiencing in their daily lives. >> we have to get the republican party back on track. we do that by winning the argument of ideas. >> let's bring in our tuesday gaggle. perry bacon jr., solinda lake and john feehery. john, i'll start with you. this is, i assume, you like hearing the words you are hearing from whether it's eric cantor, paul ryan or what we used there with bobby jindal. the question
, they're education initiatives, simplifying the tax code, health care reforms, and immigration reform. jacqui, these are all kind of popular issues that the right could take the lead on and gain traction with. but what do you think about eric cantor trying to come out to rebrand, especially, when he's been down this rebranding road before? >> yeah, we have seen this before from eric cantor. and you know, the fact that he is making this speech, to try to renew momentum on some of these issues, i mean, is something that he's been wanting to do since december, when the republicans rr pretty divided. but the devil's in the details with these kind of speeches. when you're talking about tax reform, i think he told "national review" that he wants to look at a family-friendly tax reform. well, when you have a budget chairman preparing a budget that's going to balance in ten years, it's going to be really hard to keep things like the child tax credit. so we're going to see how this pans out, because you can't talk about a budget plabalancing in years without cutting some tax cuts that are real
's in -- >> wholesale, huh? >> educational -- wholesale, trade, transportation, finance and insurance. but also, if you're looking at where the growth is occurring in the larger firms, that's happening in educational services and health and social assistance. those are the firms -- even though there are fewer of them, you know, below average right now in the 10 million plus category, they're really going to be set up for very high growth. >> when you look at these numbers, what's the biggest take-away for you and what does it tell us about the future of women-owned businesses? >> i think the biggest take-away is that this has been happening under our very noses for one thing. growing under the radar, as the report suggests. i think it shows that more and more women are getting into business and are looking around for mentors and role models and seeing more women at the high levels. that is going to help propel this growth forward, for sure. >> julie weeks, good to have you on the program. thank you. >> great to be with you. >>> and speaking of successful women, today's tweet of the day is a reminder fr
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 131 (some duplicates have been removed)